Digital Agency Services

News

Living Under a Rock? Your Website Makes Us Think So.

on Sep 29, 2016 in News |

You’ve got a website but is it doing your business any good? Flip through these 16 reasons your business needs one; a new one.  Reason #1 – It is the 21st Century That’s it. Get with it. Tech is changing quickly and to keep you, you must adapt and invest in maintaining if not flourishing with the changes. Reason #2 – It is Your Online Brochure Companies spend millions creating brochures and distributing them. By simply having a website you can skip that entirely. Again, it’s the 21st century and your potential customers will find out about you and your products online. Check out what a new design, with greater functionality and mobile-friendliness did for the Steamboat Pro Rodeo! Reason #3 – The Internet is Vast, Lean in to the Vastness More than 2.4 billion people use the internet every day, and some 90% of those have purchased something, or contacted a company, online in the last 12 months. Don’t miss out on a big piece of the pie. Reason #4 – Add Value to Your Business Plan Have you tried getting a business loan recently? It’s not easy, but if you try and the bank manager asks to see your website, you better have a pretty good one. Without a website, the perceived value of your business will be lower, especially from a customer’s perspective. Reason #5 – Help Meet Your Business Goals A well maintained website gives you the opportunity to showcase content that highlights all the aspects of your company. Content requires you to revisit aspects of your business that may have fallen to the wayside; this process gives you the opportunity to reassess your business goals. Reason #6 – 24/7 Connectivity Your website runs 24/7 without any supervision or need to lock it up. Giving your customers peace of mind as you can always be there for them. Reminder: a simple question or query form can calm a pressing concern for a customer because, at the very least, they were able to send you a message. Be sure the submitted forms land somewhere (like, your inbox!) and you have the ability to respond in a timely manner. Reason #7 – Communication with Customers By having a blog or even just...

Read More
What the Heck is Retargeting and Why Does it Work?

What the Heck is Retargeting and Why Does it Work?

on Sep 29, 2016 in News |

A customer who visits your site and looks in to a product but does not buy it is, officially, an interested shopper. For them to then see that product elsewhere online, like in their Facebook newsfeed or on the sidebar of your Google searches, will reinterest that shopper and reignite their purchase. Customer Retargeting converts window-shoppers into buyers. Generally 2% of shoppers convert on the first visit to an online store. Retargeting brings back the other 98%.Retargeting works by keeping track of people who visit your site and displaying your retargeting ads to them as they visit other sites online. Activating retargeting banner ads that follow your customers around the web with your marketing message is something you should expect from any reputable digital marketing agency. This method of online marketing will generate more web traffic to your site and help convert your best performing audiences into sales. Retargeting is most effective if you segment your visitors (eg, people who looked at cupcakes vs candy) and tailor the retargeting ads shown to each group, or not retarget them at all (eg, people who converted.) The best performing retargeting creative has a clear call-to-action and promotes an offer. Different products warrant different retargeting time windows. Eg, people shopping for travel should be retargeted immediately; people shopping for luxury goods should be retargeted later.   Steamboat Digital has paired with the most respected networks in the country to offer this service to you. We capitalize on audience insights your competitors only wish they had. We work to reach your exact target market with laser-focused campaign precision. Our media buying partners have access to publisher inventory so your message captures attention within the national websites your customers spend the most time...

Read More
Case Study: an Artist and a Video Montage

Case Study: an Artist and a Video Montage

on Sep 29, 2016 in News |

John Fawcett is an artist who has accomplished a rare feat in the art world by mastering both watercolor and oil. This diversity, along with his tremendous talent and a tenacious spirit, allows him to depict his subject matter in a way that immediately connects with the viewer. To properly showcase his magnificent pieces, Steamboat Digital created this professional video which highlights John’s installation at the Steamboat Art Museum. The video was embedded on his website and used in John’s e-newsletters to his growing and interested email database to enhance reader followthrough. John saw such great interest in the first digital video that he is collecting pieces to for another video showcase this fall. John Fawcett’s online video success story highlights the importance of graphic diversity on websites and in communication efforts. Having a professionally produced and edited digital video enhanced John’s already impressive works by bringing the narrative to life and giving them action the internet otherwise negates. Ways to Make and Use Video for Marketing your business v1 from Steamboat TV on Vimeo.    Lets start filming your story-telling digital video today....

Read More

What Would You Want in Your InBox? Add Value and Timeliness

on Sep 22, 2016 in News |

Email marketing isn’t dead, it’s just overdone, boring and often spammy. Avoid losing those hard-fought contacts by following these two simple tips: Provide Value and Be Timely. Provide Value, Not a Sales Pitch The old metaphor stands here: No one wants to hang out with the guy who talks about himself the whole time at the party. Likewise, your email subscribers don’t want to hear about how great you are and be continually pitched on products and services. Your email subscribers just aren’t that into you. You need to provide value for them and a reason to continue the relationship. A good rule to follow is the 80/20 rule: “80 percent of your content should be devoted to valuable and useful information, and 20 percent should be devoted to your offer or sales pitch.”  Why is this important? According to research from GetApp, a digital resource for email marketing software, two of the top three reasons people unsubscribe are due to the appearance of spam (17.2 percent) and irrelevant content (15.8 percent). Send Your Emails at an Opportune Time And if the stats above aren’t concerning enough, GetApp’s research shows that 46.4 percent of unsubscribes are due to simply receiving too many emails. Although every list is different, that’s no excuse. You can do your due diligence and do some testing to see how changing the frequency of your emails affects your metrics. You can also simply look it up using your email campaign software. MailChimp, for example, offers insights based on industry and geography. Open rates vary by industry, but in general, the highest opening rate for email broadcasts (21.7 percent) occurs in the evening after people have left work and had dinner, such as between 8 p.m. and midnight. Such times also had better conversion rates. Avoid losing those hard-won contacts by providing content, through email marketing, that adds value to their day, answers questions they didn’t even know they wanted to ask and communicates your company’s understanding of their needs. Be sure your 80 is genuine and thoughtful and that your 20 is effective and clear. Email marketing is one of the most direct and most effective ways you can drive immediate interest in your business — you just have to do it right.    ...

Read More

Blogging: Get Started, Get Good or Get Left Behind

on Sep 22, 2016 in News |

Blogging is one of the most valuable tools that businesses have to engage with customers. If you’re not blogging, it’s time to get started or get left behind. First, let’s think about the ways people find your website: Current Customers: they could type your name right in to their browser, but that’s an audience you already have. They know who you are, you’re on their radar, and that doesn’t help you get more traffic on top of what you’re already getting. Tisk Tisk: you could pay for traffic by buying an email list (don’t you dare!), blasting them, and hoping some people open and click through on the emails. But that’s expensive and, you know, illegal, not to mention the poor success rate of unsolicited emails… Mad Men: you could pay for traffic by placing tons of paid ads, which can be quite expensive. And the second you run out of money, your traffic stops coming, too. So, how can you drive any traffic? In short: blogging, social media, and search engines. Think about how many pages there are on your website. Probably not a ton, right? And think about how often you update those pages. Probably not that often, right? (How often can you really update your About Us page, you know?) Well, blogging helps solve both of those problems. Every time you write a blog post, it’s one more indexed page on your website, which means it’s one more opportunity for you to show up in search engines and drive traffic to your website in organic search. Blogging benefits your SEO, giving Google one more cue to bring yours to the top! An active, SEO rich blog can make a huge impact on how easily you are found by those looking. Blogging also helps you get discovered via social media. Every time you write a blog post, you’re creating content that people can share on social networks — Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook, Pinterest — which helps expose your business to a new audience that may not know you yet. Blog content also helps keep your social media presence going — instead of asking your social media manager to come up with brand new original content for social media (or creating that content yourself), your blog can serve as that...

Read More

Become LinkedIn Savvy in Three Steps

on Aug 22, 2016 in News |

While social media redesigns the meaning of branding, consumers change, too. From buying habits to keystroke searches, your business now relies on more than what you sell but also, how you look. Your content is probably awesome, because you made it and you’re really good at what you do. How, now, do you get others to find it? Social media, that’s how. There are two places your content is guaranteed to be published: your website and social media. While Facebook can feel silly and Twitter can seem flighty, LinkedIn is tried and true, and happens to be considered a professional site, so it’s ok to read, write and publish articles while at work. Three Rules to Follow When Publishing on LinkedIn. Link Back, Attribute Authentically and Restate: Posting to LinkedIn is done with the goal of generating leads and excitement. Therefore, you want to be sure to always link back to your blog, or state that this article was previously published there, or you’re accidentally nullifying the platform’s main utility. You’ve got an educated audience, interested in what you have to say, be sure you state it clearly, link it back and restate how your X will make their Y better. Tracking URLs and Improving ROIs: Acronym this and acronym that. Everything has an ROI (return on investment), including your LinkedIn posts, and to increase that ROI, you have to measure your content. Utilizing a tracking URL when linking back to your company blog or website, ensures that you will collect important data on what posts are directing readers to your site. With a tracking URL you can easily identify what articles and topics resonate most with your readers, as objectively shown by the metrics. Call to Action: It is always prudent to include opportunities for readers to make their way through the next steps, find out more or simply land on your page. Do this with a clean, simple and attractive call to action (CTA). Think of a CTA as a guiding light to gated content, the true aggregators of qualified leads. Include CTAs that can provide value to your readers, and entice them to continue engaging with you. Don’t go crazy with sales pitches here; simply offer them something in exchange for an email. You want to avoid making your content in to an advertisement, which is definitely not the goal of your content marketing efforts. LinkedIn’s most valuable asset is it’s natural tendency towards Inbound Marketing. Inbound...

Read More